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GLOSSARY
FRUCTOOLIGOSACCARIDES (FOS)

Fructooligosaccarides (FOS)

 

How does it work?

Fructo-oligosaccharides are plant fructose units linked in chains, and are found naturally in many plant foods such as bananas, oats, asparagus, leaks, onions and garlic.1 2 FOS are used as a high dietary fibre source, as a prebiotic (nourishment for bowel bacteria), and to improve bowel function.3 Other physiological effects include improved mineral absorption, reduction of serum cholesterol and low carcinogenicity.4 When used as a supplement, FOS increases stool mass and frequency of motions therefore helping prevent and treat constipation as well as maintain digestive health.5

What results can be expected?

FOS assists in the maintenance of bowel health, helping to prevent and treat constipation through providing healthy amounts of fibre, prebiotics, bowel motions and stool consistency.6

1Pengelly, A. (2004). The Constituents of Medicinal Plants (2nd ed.). Crows Nest: Allen and Unwin.

3Pengelly, A. (2004). The Constituents of Medicinal Plants (2nd ed.). Crows Nest: Allen and Unwin pp186.

4Sabater-Molina, M et al. (2009). Dietary fructooligosaccharides and potential benefits on health. J Physiol Biochem., 65(3), 315-28. Retrieved Feb 2014, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20119826

5Sabater-Molina, M et al. (2009). Dietary fructooligosaccharides and potential benefits on health. J Physiol Biochem., 65(3), 315-28. Retrieved Feb 2014, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20119826

6Sabater-Molina, M et al. (2009). Dietary fructooligosaccharides and potential benefits on health. J Physiol Biochem., 65(3), 315-28. Retrieved Feb 2014, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20119826